LockedRehabilitation - Tricep Tendontis

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Lynx100
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2005/05/28 06:06:40 (permalink)
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Rehabilitation - Tricep Tendontis

What is triceps tendonitis?
The triceps muscle, which acts to straighten your arm, is attached to the bony bump at the back of your elbow by a large tendon. Triceps tendonitis is inflammation of that tendon, a strong band of connective tissue, which causes pain in the back part of the upper arm near the point of your elbow.

How does it occur?
Triceps tendonitis occurs from overuse (a wear and tear process) of the upper arm and elbow, repetitive extension against a force especially in activities like throwing and hammering and is commonly seen in weighliters. It may also be caused by a direct blow to the triceps muscle or tendon.

Symptoms may include:
  • pain when you straighten your elbow or fully bend your elbow
  • tenderness at the triceps muscle and tendon
  • swelling near the point of the elbow.
  • How is it diagnosed?
    Your doctor will review your history and examine your arm and elbow. If they suspect there may be a chip off the bone at the point of your elbow which could be pressing or irritating the tendon and causing it to get inflamed, he or she may order an x-ray or MRI depending on the severity of the condition.

    How is it treated?
    Triceps tendonitis is treated with:
    • Activity modification – this means that any activity which puts strain on the triceps should be stopped for a period of atleast 2 weeks.
    • Ice – Put ice packs on the painful area for 20 minutes, 3 times a day until there is no pain at rest. It is important to be careful when icing your elbow as there is an important nerve runs just under the skin and can be damaged if you ice more than is recommended.
    • Anti-inflammatory Meds - Your doctor may recommend an anti-inflammatory such as ibuprofen.
    • Brace/Strap – This may be used to wrap around the lower part of your triceps during activities that cause discomfort or pain. It functions by taking the pressure off the tendon. A brief period of splinting (7–10 days) is usually the rule.
    • Rehabilitation exercises – see below
    • Surgical treatment - operative treatment is not indicated unless the pathologic process is actually a rupture and not inflammation of the tendon. Optimal surgical results are obtained within 14 days of the injury.
    Rehabilitation

    Everyone recovers from injury at a different rate. Return to your activity will be determined by how soon your arm recovers, not by how many days or weeks it has been since your injury occurred. In general, the longer you have symptoms before you start treatment, the longer it will take to get better.

    The general rule for being able to return to daily activities/sport are when:
    • You no longer have tenderness or swelling at your triceps muscle or tendon.
    • You have regained strength in your injured arm so that it is similar to the strength of your uninjured arm.
    • You have full range of motion in your injured arm compared to your uninjured arm.
    Rehabilitation Exercises
     
    You may do all of these exercises after there is no pain at rest. As usual, start with light/no weights and progress up slowly by adding resistence. If at any time the pain comes back, stop and rest and ice. If, the next day, the pain is gone, start again with a lower level of resistence. Too much too soon could worsen the injury and increase the chances of a partial rupture/tear.
    • French stretch: Stand with your fingers clasped together and your hands high above your head. Stretch by reaching down behind your head and trying to touch your upper back while keeping your hands clasped. Keep your elbows as close to your ears as possible. Hold this position for 15 to 20 seconds. Repeat 3 to 6 times. 
    • Triceps towel stretch: Stand with your injured arm over your head and your other arm down behind your back. Hold one end of a towel in each hand. Stretch your injured arm behind your head by pulling the towel down toward the floor with hand of your uninjured arm. Keep the elbow of your injured arm as close to your ear as possible. Hold for 15 to 20 seconds. Repeat 3 to 6 times.
    • Towel resistance exercise: Holding the towel as in the towel stretch above, lift the hand of your injured arm toward the ceiling while creating resistance by pulling down on the towel with your other hand. Keep the elbow of your injured arm as close to your ear as possible. Hold for 10 seconds. Repeat 10 times. 
    • French press: Sit grasping a small weight with both hands as if it were a baseball bat. Reach toward the ceiling. Bending your elbows, slowly lower the weight behind your head until the weight touches your upper back. Lift the weight up over your head and reach toward the ceiling again. Repeat 10 to 20 times. 
    • Modified push-ups: Get onto your hands and knees, with your hands directly underneath your shoulders. Slowly lower yourself toward the floor, being careful to keep your spine straight. When you can do 2 sets of 15 easily, do this with your heels in the air. Gradually progress to doing this with your legs out straight. 
    • Triceps kick back: Lean forward with the hand of your uninjured arm resting on a table or chair for support. Hold a weight in the hand of your injured arm. Keep the elbow of your injured arm against your side. Your arm should be bent at a 90-degree angle with your upper arm parallel to the floor. Move the forearm of your injured arm backward until it is straight. Repeat 10 to 20 times.
    post edited by Lynx100 - 2005/05/28 06:09:45
    #1
    Nic
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    RE: Rehabilitation - Tricep Tendontis 2005/06/05 09:54:28 (permalink)
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    Thanks a lot Lynx ! Since my girlfirend works in physical rehabs, I was doing some of the tips you said above ! But now I know more on my damn elbow problem !


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    #2
    Lynx100
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    RE: Rehabilitation - Tricep Tendontis 2005/06/05 14:10:18 (permalink)
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    Thanks a lot Lynx ! Since my girlfirend works in physical rehabs, I was doing some of the tips you said above ! But now I know more on my damn elbow problem !

     
    Dont mention it.
     
    If these exercises dont provide any relief let me know. I'm in the process of putting together a post about epicondylitis/tennis elbow.
     
    #3
    bdptcob
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    RE: Rehabilitation - Tricep Tendontis 2006/03/20 23:14:11 (permalink)
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    I know this is an old article but I have a question regarding it. I believe I have triceps tendonitis. Middle of the inside of my arm, running to my elbow. I purchased a strap to help with it. However, where would I place this strap on my arm? I read lower tricep. However, my arm actually hurts closer to my elbow.
    #4
    Italianangel
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    RE: Rehabilitation - Tricep Tendontis 2006/03/24 20:44:31 (permalink)
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    I would look at epicondylitus and some tennis elbow exercises which are mainly wrist ones.....

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    #5
    Lynx100
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    RE: Rehabilitation - Tricep Tendontis 2006/03/25 17:39:22 (permalink)
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    Tennis elbow/epicondylitis are injuries to do primarily with the hand extensors/flexor muscle groups. Pain on the inside of your arm is unliklely to be tennis elbow.
     
    Could very well be tricep tendonitis.

    Placing it on your lower tricep is correct. What this effectively does is shorten the tricep tendon so the point at which the tendon 'operates' (i.e. the tension or pivot point of the tendon belly) is not the part of the tricep that is injured which is protected by the strap.
     
    So by placing the strap over the injured part of the tricep tendon, you effectively take that part out of the equation or make it work far less than it normally does when it comes to moving the muscle.
     
    Does that make sense?
    #6
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