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Apply ice then heat, or apply heat then ice?

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G.A.M.E. 77
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RE: Apply ice then heat, or apply heat then ice? 2007/01/14 13:45:46 (permalink)
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sorry but i may have made a mistake. i checked with the orthopedist again, he said it may be a "sprain in a ligament". im not sure if there's a difference... All in all, i am growing more and more agitated b/c of this injury. i havent been able to lift in a month, and going to the gym was something i worked into my daily routine. is there any possible way to speed up the healing process? ive been icing it, taking glutamine.... i was told by a PT that doing my normal workouts with light weights should help, but i only did that once because even though the weights were light, the pain came back. I have done RC exercises, but im not sure of the progress. I hate the feeling that i am losing strength!!! Any ideas how to keep the strength w/o making the injury more severe?? Also, will there be an uneven strength distribution in my shoulders after the injury heals?
danmirage
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RE: Apply ice then heat, or apply heat then ice? 2007/01/14 15:07:19 (permalink)
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Focus!
 
Missin #1 is to heal completely...NOT to find a shortcut.
 
Also, will there be an uneven strength distribution in my shoulders after the injury heals?

No.  You will train both sides based upon the weakest side and they will even out.
 
is there any possible way to speed up the healing process? ive been icing it, taking glutamine....

Optimal nutrition.  Perhaps even use pro-biotics.  Omega-3s (krill oil)  Antioxidants.
 
Look into DMSO FROM A HEALTH FOOD STORETopically applied to the affected area.
 
This should be in water.  One with a roller applicator is very helpful..because this is a solvent and anything you touch with it or during application can be transported into the body with it!
 
I believe your PT is referring to doing the movements with a weight you could do say 50+ reps easily with...we are talking about super light weight...to get circulation into the area!!!
 
In the meantime, you are going to take up reading peotry, walking, biking, movies, listent to radio...something to enrich yourself for the weeks it takes to heal COMPLETELY>
 
Again,
Missin #1 is to heal completely!
G.A.M.E. 77
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RE: Apply ice then heat, or apply heat then ice? 2007/01/14 15:22:31 (permalink)
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ok sounds good thanks!! ill try to keep my mind off of it and let it heal. Ive been drinking alot of Green Tea too which is said to have alot of antioxidants in it. Oh, whats this DMSO stuff??
danmirage
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RE: Apply ice then heat, or apply heat then ice? 2007/01/14 19:16:27 (permalink)
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DMSO (which stands for dimethyl sulfoxide) is a versatile compound with many uses (and a checkered past.)
 
It is both a prescription drug and an industrial solvent. It’s formed as a byproduct of wood pulp processing; its use is determined by the quality: You will find industrial-grade DMSO in paint thinner and antifreeze, and medical-grade DMSO in many medical laboratories. Its industrial usefulness comes from its remarkable solvent qualities, and much of its medical value from its ability to transport other substances through cell membranes. It is also reported to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.
 
Medical-grade DMSO is safe, and is widely used in medical processes. DMSO is the chemical used to protect human tissue (such as bone marrow, stem cells and embryos) when frozen for storage. It’s also an FDA-approved prescription drug (called Rimso) given by catheter for interstitial cystitis, a painful bladder condition.
 
Thousands of scientific papers have been published about DMSO’s chemistry, including test tube, animal and human studies. Some have shown DMSO can relieve muscle and joint pain; reduce inflammation; soften collagen to relieve scleroderma symptoms; help heal skin ulcers caused by diabetes and scleroderma; and relieve blood vessel constrictions common to Raynaud’s phenomenon. Other research has suggested it may help prevent brain damage after stroke or head injuries. And it appears to have few side effects, even at very high dosages.
 
DMSO is approved for use in many countries for arthritis and related conditions.
 
DMSO’s ability as a solvent to transport molecules across cell membranes is a potential problem. It means that when used topically DMSO can carry anything - including toxins - straight through the skin and directly into the body.
 
DMSO also has a harmless but unpleasant side effect: Taken internally or even used externally, it causes a bad taste in the mouth and makes those who use it smell like garlic or oysters.
 
I don't experience this unless used over a large area topically.
 
The conservative advice on DMSO is this:

  • Don’t buy DMSO on your own: Ask your doctor to find a medical-grade source. Almost all DMSO available to the public is industrial grade - including most veterinary DMSO and products sold in health food stores and on the Internet - and may not be safe for medical use.
  • Do not try DMSO without a doctor’s help. It’s a powerful transdermal agent, which means it can carry anything that touches it through your skin and into your body.
  • If you have a reaction, stop using the product and see your doctor. Some people may have an allergic reaction, skin irritation or itching from DMSO applied externally.
  • Be aware DMSO has been known to cause bad breath or a bad taste in the mouth (like garlic or oysters) among those who use it, whether it’s taken orally or applied to the skin.

From 70 percent to 90 percent DMSO by concentration has been found to be the most effective strength crossing through the skin.
 
DMSO reduces inflammation by several mechanisms. It is an antioxidant, a scavenger of the free radicals that gather at the site of injury.   Among the well-documented pharmacologic properties of DMSO include analgesia, anti-inflammation, softening of scar tissue, hydroxyl radical scavenging, vasodilation, and stimulation of healing.


danmirage
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RE: Apply ice then heat, or apply heat then ice? 2007/01/14 20:41:46 (permalink)
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Oh..Green tea!  Great!!!
G.A.M.E. 77
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RE: Apply ice then heat, or apply heat then ice? 2007/01/16 07:48:43 (permalink)
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Sounds good, i'm gonna look into this stuff. As for the injury, ive just been giving it rest. Do everyday activities agrivate the arm and slow down the healing process (ex. holding open doors, reaching to higher laces) because i sometimes feel pain when i do. Also, the doctor is not sure if it is a ligament or not, i need to confirm it with an MRI. The lingering minor pain is becoming agitating  From the symptoms i listed, "I have a SLIGHT pain in my shoulder (deltoid area), nothing too bad at all. It doesn't hurt much at all anymore, but it did at one point.", does it sound like just a minor injury to a ligament. Also, can you ballpark how long it will take to heal, just an estimate to work with?? Thanks a bunch!!
danmirage
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RE: Apply ice then heat, or apply heat then ice? 2007/01/16 09:34:22 (permalink)
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Making that kind of guess would be sort of silly...it really depends on what the trouble is.  It could be a simple tear or something more complex.
 
I honestly could not say. 
 
Just to be scary, I will tell you that I had a tendon injury in my wrist (I was struck by a car) that took 6 months to completely heal.  After it healed completely, It still took another 6 months to get it back up to full strength.  Tendons heal and adapt slowly.
G.A.M.E. 77
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RE: Apply ice then heat, or apply heat then ice? 2007/01/17 07:45:47 (permalink)
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were you in pain? i dont feel alot of pain at all, just a small pain. i really hope i dont have the same magnitude of the injury! ill get the MRI and see what happens, and hope that it'll show good results....
danmirage
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RE: Apply ice then heat, or apply heat then ice? 2007/01/17 08:10:35 (permalink)
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There was discomfort, not exactly pain..unless I tried to train!
 
Your injury IS different than mine.  Not to worry.
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